the white lighter

Admittedly, this blog and its maintainer have eclectic tastes. "Eclectic," as you might suspect, is a nice way of saying that there is very little intertwining theme to any of this. If you end up liking some (or most) of the things I like, you might find that wondrous.

I seek to post only items which are credited to the originator, be it fine art, photography, tattoos, or writing. If you see something uncredited, do feel free to point it out to me. Also: ask anything. Call me out if I fuck up. Give props if you feel like it. Ask questions. I like internet interaction.
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Posts tagged "history"

ferrarisheppard:

Banana Split. 1956. (Gordon Parks)

These are visually beautiful photographs, but the details are devastating. As they should be.

(via garconniere)

Going to NYC in an hour; this is a good reminder.

(via workingforvacation)

blackgirldangerous:

by Mia McKenzie

On Memorial Day, I wrote a post about The Fallen: the people in my communities and in society and in history who have been casualties of the war on black and brown people that this country has been fighting since 1492. Now it’s Independence Day.

Hmm.

I grew up in Philadelphia, the so-called “cradle of liberty.” As a kid, I spent many a field trip at the Betsy Ross House and at Independence Hall, learning the stories of my “forefathers,” who, rebelling against the tyranny of the British monarchy, “founded” a “new” nation whose principles were “liberty” and “equality” and “democracy,” and all that awesome-sounding stuff. Yes, there I was, little black me, being told all this by teachers who never blinked an eye over the hypocrisy of it all. (There were no field trips about “slavery,” by the way). Luckily, I got conscious somewhere along the way and figured out what the founding of this nation, and its subsequent growth, owed to brown and black people in whose blood and on whose backs it was erected.

I am always amazed at people who go around waving US flags and exalting the greatness of this nation, particularly on days like this. Not even because of the brutal racist history of this nation, which does not necessarily preclude its possible present greatness. But because of the present of this nation. Which does.

In the world, the U.S. ranks:

  • 10th in literacy
  • 25th in math
  • 17th in science
  • 38th in life expectancy

and

  • 1st in incarceration
  • 1st in military expenditures
  • 1st in number of billionaires


Is this what people are waving flags about??

I wonder if some of the energy Americans spend waving flags and getting pissed when some of us question the historic and current practices of this nation was actually spent learning about and trying to understand the consequences of the historic and current practices of this nation, and building some kind of analysis around it. What greatness might develop from such an endeavor as that? What if today—while we scarf down burgers and potato salad—we think about what we are celebrating and why.

Because I love a good BBQ. I really do. But you know what I also love? Not walking around with my head up my ass.

Happy 4th!

ONLY THREE DAYS LEFT TO CONTRIBUTE TO THE BLACK GIRL DANGEROUS WRITING WORKSHOP FOR QUEER, TRANS*, AND GENDER-NON-CONFORMING WRITERS OF COLOR! PLEASE HELP! WATCH THIS VIDEO! THEN GO HERE!!


Black Girl Dangerous Writing Workshop Video from Black Girl Dangerous onVimeo.

image

Mia McKenzie is a writer and a smart, scrappy Philadelphian with a deep love of vegan pomegranate ice cream and fake fur collars. She is a black feminist and a freaking queer, facts that are often reflected in her writings, which have won her some awards and grants, such as the Astraea Foundation’s Writers Fund Award and the Leeway Foundation’s Transformation Award. She just finished a novel and has a short story forthcoming in The Kenyon Review. Her work has been published at Jezebel.com, and recommended by The Root, Colorlines, Feministing, Angry Asian Man, and Crunk Feminist Collective. She is a nerd, and the creator of Black Girl Dangerous, a revolutionary blog.

inkletting:

theoddmentemporium:

woodsmaiden:

Hobo Nickels are re-engraved/re-carved old buffalo nickels that were minted in the USA from 1917-1938. The tradition started during the Great Depression with the traveling Hobos who would alter the face of the nickel and then trade them for necessities.

Хочу

(via mattlodder)

mikeadamstattoo:

So, if any of you didn’t know, here’s some tattoo history. Standard coil tattoo machines are essentially electromagents; two copper wire wound cores create the electromagnet when voltage is sent through. This came from old electric doorbells, which use the same exact specs. I collect old doorbells, because I feel that they’re a very important part of tattoo history.
I came across these antique doorbuzzers. Instead of the armature bar being connected to a long rod that rings a bell, (like many old doorbells) the brass piece between the coils rings the bell, as the whole buzzer itself was placed inside a bell. When the brass piece moved up and down, it rang.
Since tattoo machines are essentially doorbells with a tube vise and a nipple bar, I decided to do just that to one of these buzzers (left), and it’s now a functional tattoo machine. My favorite part is that there’s no capacitor, so it’s loud as all hell and sparks a ton. It just overall sounds terrifying, but it’s awesome. I wish I knew exactly how old the buzzers are.
Sorry to bore you with that history lesson. You can go back to your Tumblr feed of weird sex pictures and animated gifs of stuff now.
thanks - Mike Adams.

My partner is back there making a tattoo machine right now — rather fitting that I read about them on the internet, he gets his hands dirty making the things.

mikeadamstattoo:

So, if any of you didn’t know, here’s some tattoo history. Standard coil tattoo machines are essentially electromagents; two copper wire wound cores create the electromagnet when voltage is sent through. This came from old electric doorbells, which use the same exact specs. I collect old doorbells, because I feel that they’re a very important part of tattoo history.

I came across these antique doorbuzzers. Instead of the armature bar being connected to a long rod that rings a bell, (like many old doorbells) the brass piece between the coils rings the bell, as the whole buzzer itself was placed inside a bell. When the brass piece moved up and down, it rang.

Since tattoo machines are essentially doorbells with a tube vise and a nipple bar, I decided to do just that to one of these buzzers (left), and it’s now a functional tattoo machine. My favorite part is that there’s no capacitor, so it’s loud as all hell and sparks a ton. It just overall sounds terrifying, but it’s awesome. I wish I knew exactly how old the buzzers are.

Sorry to bore you with that history lesson. You can go back to your Tumblr feed of weird sex pictures and animated gifs of stuff now.

thanks - Mike Adams.

My partner is back there making a tattoo machine right now — rather fitting that I read about them on the internet, he gets his hands dirty making the things.

sexismandthecity:

Dr. Mary Edwards Walker (right) and her friend, Dorothy Hunt, Chicago, December 2, 1912

Mary Edwards Walker (November 26, 1832 – February 21, 1919) was an American feminist, abolitionist, prohibitionist, alleged spy, prisoner of war and surgeon. She is the only woman ever to receive the Medal of Honor.

Prior to the American Civil War she earned her medical degree, married and started a medical practice. The practice didn’t do well and she volunteered with the Union Army at the outbreak of the American Civil War and served as a female surgeon. She was captured by Confederate forces after crossing enemy lines to treat wounded civilians and arrested as a spy. She was sent as a prisoner of war to Richmond, Virginia until released in a prisoner exchange.

After the war she was approved for the United States military’s highest decoration for bravery, the Medal of Honor, for her efforts during the war. She is the only woman to receive the medal and one of only eight civilians to receive it. Her medal was later rescinded based on an Army determination and then restored in 1977. After the war she was a writer and lecturer supporting the women’s suffrage movement until her death in 1919.

tuesday-johnson:

ca. 1888, [Man Inside Glass Bottle], John C. Higgins

via the Metropolitan Museum of Art, Photographic Collections

tuesday-johnson:

ca. 1870, [Anonymous Hand Reaching Toward Unidentified Woman and Man Holding Bottle]
via the International Center of Photography

tuesday-johnson:

ca. 1870, [Anonymous Hand Reaching Toward Unidentified Woman and Man Holding Bottle]

via the International Center of Photography

sexismandthecity:

Emma Goldman is known as a rebel, an anarchist, an ardent proponent of birth control and free speech, a feminist, a lecturer and a writer.

Born in what is now Lithuania but was then Russia, in a Jewish ghetto, moved early to Königsberg and St. Petersburg, where she became involved with university radicals. Emma Goldman left for America in 1885 with her half sister Helen Zodokoff, working in the textile industry in Rochester, New York.

Briefly married in 1887, Emma Goldman moved in 1889 to New York where she quickly became active in the anarchist movement. She became one of the most outspoken and well-known of American radicals, lecturing and writing on anarchism, women’s rights and other political topics. She also wrote and lectured on “new drama,” drawing out the social messages of Ibsen, Strindberg, Shaw, and others.

Emma Goldman served prison and jail terms for such activities as advising the unemployed to take bread if their pleas for food were not answered, for giving information in a lecture on birth control, for opposing military conscription, and in 1908 she was deprived of her citizenship.

In 1917, with Alexander Berkman, Emma Goldman was convicted of conspiracy against the draft laws, and sentenced to to years in prison and fined $10,000.

In 1919 Emma Goldman, along with her long-time associate Alexander Berkman and 247 others who had been targeted in the Red Scare after World War I, emigrated to Russia on the Buford. But Emma Goldman’s libertarian socialism led to her Disillusionment in Russia, as the title of her 1923 work says it. She lived in Europe, obtained British citizenship through marrying the Welshman James Colton, and traveled through many nations giving lectures.

Without US citizenship, Emma Goldman was prohibited, except for a brief stay in 1934, from entering the United States. She spent her final years aiding the anti-Franco forces in Spain through lecturing and fund-raising. Succumbing to a stroke and its effects, she died in Canada in 1940 and was buried in Chicago, near the graves of the Haymarket anarchists. via

(via equalityandthecity)